[PDF / Epub] ✓ Carry Me Home ★ Diane McWhorter – Buyphenergan500.us

Carry Me Home The Year Of Birmingham Was A Cataclysmic Turning Point In America S Long Civil Rights Struggle That Spring, Child Demonstrators Faced Down Police Dogs And Fire Hoses In Huge Nonviolent Marches For Desegregation A Few Months Later, Ku Klux Klansmen Retaliated By Bombing The Sixteenth Street Baptist Church And Killing Four Young Black Girls Diane McWhorter, Journalist And Daughter Of A Prominent Birmingham Family, Weaves Together Police And FBI Documents, Interviews With Black Activists And Former Klansmen, And Personal Memories Into An Extraordinary Narrative Of The City, The Personalities, And The Events That Brought About America S Second Emancipation

[PDF / Epub] ✓ Carry Me Home  ★ Diane McWhorter – Buyphenergan500.us
  • Paperback
  • 720 pages
  • Carry Me Home
  • Diane McWhorter
  • English
  • 12 July 2019
  • 0743217721

    10 thoughts on “[PDF / Epub] ✓ Carry Me Home ★ Diane McWhorter – Buyphenergan500.us


  1. says:

    Carry Me Home is a thorough account of the history of the fight for civil rights in Birmingham, Alabama McWhorter gives detailed background on the politics behind segregationist groups, Dixiecrats, and the Freedom Movement Also covered are the Freedom Rides, local marches led by Martin Luther King and Fred Shuttlesworth, and the various bombings in the area, culminating with the bombing at the 16th Street Baptist Church that killed four young girls during Sunday School McWhorter wraps up with Carry Me Home is a thorough account of the history of the fight for civil rights in Birmingham, Alabama McWhorter gives detailed background on the politics behind segregationist groups, Dixiecrats, and the Freedom Movement Also covered are the Freedom Rides, local marches led by Martin Luther King and Fred Shuttlesworth, and the various bombings in the area, culminating with the bombing at the 16th Street Baptist Church that killed four young girls during Sunday School McWhorter wraps up with a follow up on what happened to the major players, and the trials of the two remaining bombers that led to their convictions Interspersed throughout the book are the author s own recollections of these years and the part her father may or may not have played in any nefarious acts.This was a very good book and worthy of its Pulitzer Prize It was exhaustive and is very dense but very much worth the read It definitely takes you to that time and helps the reader to understand the climate and tense atmosphere of Birmingham, Alabama from the early 40s through the 60s and beyond


  2. says:

    The full story of BirminghamI did not know that this book had won the Pulitzer Prize for non fiction in 2001 when I started reading it It richly deserves the prize Written by a baby boomer who as a pre adolescent during the crucial years of the 60 s, lived in Birmingham as a privileged member of white society Later in life, seeking to understand the history of that time she embarked on a 20 year project to set down the history of the 20th century in Birmingham She tells the story in its fu The full story of BirminghamI did not know that this book had won the Pulitzer Prize for non fiction in 2001 when I started reading it It richly deserves the prize Written by a baby boomer who as a pre adolescent during the crucial years of the 60 s, lived in Birmingham as a privileged member of white society Later in life, seeking to understand the history of that time she embarked on a 20 year project to set down the history of the 20th century in Birmingham She tells the story in its full complexity, then added postscripts of the trial in 2001 of two of the church bombers, who murdered four schoolchildren in 1963, and finally the passing of icon Fred Shuttlesworth in 2012


  3. says:

    The Women s National Book Association sent this book to the White House today March 16 in honor of Women s History Month the Women s National Book Association s press release In Carry Me Home, McWhorter returns to Birmingham in 1963, the site of civil rights demonstrations met with brutal resistance by law enforcement and the bombing of a historic black church that left four innocent black girls dead under the rubble After Birmingham, segregation, The Women s National Book Association sent this book to the White House today March 16 in honor of Women s History Month the Women s National Book Association s press release In Carry Me Home, McWhorter returns to Birmingham in 1963, the site of civil rights demonstrations met with brutal resistance by law enforcement and the bombing of a historic black church that left four innocent black girls dead under the rubble After Birmingham, segregation, America s version of apartheid, became unsustainable McWhorter tells the story of Birmingham in compelling and, at times shocking, detail Reviewers frequently use the word novelistic to describe this work, referencing Tolstoy s War Peace and Homer s Iliad


  4. says:

    FINALLY Wow, this book took me forever to read It s so huge and densely packed with information that I really don t know how to rate it There were parts I liked a lot and other parts where I just felt overwhelmed by all the names flying at me I would certainly need to read itthan once to have a chance of absorbing it all.


  5. says:

    Terrorism bombings, murders, assaults, sabotage and other forms of mayhem is a coward s business Only a coward would assemble a group of men to assault a single victim Only a coward would blow up a residence or church where children were present Only a coward would wear a white sheet over his face to conceal his identity while committing these crimes.A coward would also support these atrocities without actually being involved in it.A coward would also observe this madness, know that it Terrorism bombings, murders, assaults, sabotage and other forms of mayhem is a coward s business Only a coward would assemble a group of men to assault a single victim Only a coward would blow up a residence or church where children were present Only a coward would wear a white sheet over his face to conceal his identity while committing these crimes.A coward would also support these atrocities without actually being involved in it.A coward would also observe this madness, know that it is wrong, and then look the other way A coward would hope that even though he wasn t willing to do anything about it, the atrocities would stop There s no shortage of cowards in Diane McWhorter s Carry Me Home From the perpetrators, to the supporters, to the enablers, to the deniers, the parade of cowards has no end.But there are other role players as well.To be fair, McWhorter paints a complex picture of a complicated town Birmingham, Alabama, in spite of its reputation, is not one dimensional The bad guys don t all wear black hats The good guys don t always have pure motives Good intentions often produce unintended harm Thoughtful plans backfire.The wealthy Birmingham bulls exploit the hourly wage workers They stoke their fears and prey on their insecurities A lot of the violence is a consequence of keeping wages low and jobs scarce The uneducated laborer doesn t hate his neighbor because of the color of his skin, he s terrified by the threat of losing his livelihood to him First they ll take our schools, then they ll take our jobs is the mantra that leads the fearful to acts of violence.Terrorism is a coward s business, indeed


  6. says:

    Exhaustive, and exhausting, chronicle of how desegregation came to Birmingham, after decades of anti labor violence became anti civil rights violence Carry Me Home is a minutely detailed example of how brutally we fight against class change, and how many interlocking layers of our society use fear and coercion to maintain the status quo I can t help but wish the story wassimply told here, though, as I struggled to maintain focus and clarity through the many strands of her narrative A Exhaustive, and exhausting, chronicle of how desegregation came to Birmingham, after decades of anti labor violence became anti civil rights violence Carry Me Home is a minutely detailed example of how brutally we fight against class change, and how many interlocking layers of our society use fear and coercion to maintain the status quo I can t help but wish the story wassimply told here, though, as I struggled to maintain focus and clarity through the many strands of her narrative A definitive work, about a pivotal period of American history, but often a tough read


  7. says:

    The Autobiography of BombinghamJournalist Diane McWhorter is a Birmingham native who was ten at the time that the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing killed four young girls and had her eleventh birthday just a few weeks before the assassination of JFK She was born into one of the old affluent white families in Birmingham, with a lineage of men who had been influential movers and shakers in the city s history In this sense, she was born on the wrong side of history, as she says, so this ma The Autobiography of BombinghamJournalist Diane McWhorter is a Birmingham native who was ten at the time that the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing killed four young girls and had her eleventh birthday just a few weeks before the assassination of JFK She was born into one of the old affluent white families in Birmingham, with a lineage of men who had been influential movers and shakers in the city s history In this sense, she was born on the wrong side of history, as she says, so this massive account of the city s history and the racial pressure cooker that exploded in 1963 is personal as well as historical In uncovering the social, political climate of this troubled industrial metropolis she must also do a great deal of genealogical soul searching.This book is by no means a quick, fast paced narrative nevertheless, it is an indispensable document for anyone that wants to understand the epicenter of the 1960 s civil rights movement McWhorter tells everything you d ever care to know about the history of Birmingham and plentyThe cast of characters makes War and Peace seem like a sparsely populated historical tale Much as Tolstoy s original intent to explore the Decembrist revolt led him back to the seminal circumstances and the larger historical canvas, McWhorter uses the pivotal dramatic moment in the city s history, the church bombing that killed the four girls, as the impetus for an epic investigation into the culture of the city that made such an event not only possible but inevitable.Birmingham, the Pittsburgh of the South , seemed predisposed for social and political unrest almost from the beginning Earlier in the century, labor disputes and the ensuing suppression of labor unions and the outside Communist agitators were the predominant struggles, with the rigid Jim Crow social structure keeping the Negro population subservient by denying opportunities for employment or education, thus ensuring that that racial demographic remained powerless through poverty as well as ignorance As glimmerings of resistance from the black population began to be noticed, the Communist threat began to be merged with the Negro threat to the extent that the white power structure fused the two into one neatly packaged enemy.McWhorter devotes equal time and space to all the sides in the ensuing struggles She explains how the power structure was a carefully woven tapestry binding the political leaders with the business leaders with the news media with the KKK with the states rights proponents The public safety commissioner boss Bull Connor was a stereotypical racist redneck tyrant who would have been hilariously buffoonish Negroes and whites will not segregate together if he wasn t so frighteningly powerful Mayor Tom Hanes may have been the ostensible leader of the city but Bull was the real power behind the scenes He ruled the police force and made the Klan s terrorist activity easier to implement with impunity On the other side of the color barrier, the local leader of the civil rights movement was Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth Shuttlesworth was also a very colorful character, as flamboyant as he was fearless He had been physically beaten in front of Phillips High School and miraculously survived the explosion of a bomb planted literally under his bedroom He had gotten back up and brushed himself off so many times he was said to have nine lives Never one to mince words, he was never thought of as a diplomat and had to cede the floor of the public platform to the eloquent orator and universally acknowledged leader Martin Luther King who, in McWhorter s account, had a habit of arriving on a scene after an tremendously violent episode to calm fears and give voice to the vision of the movement Shuttlesworth was the primary force goading King into aactivist role, which King did, not without reluctance, in visiting Birmingham and being arrested and incarcerated, leading him to write the manifesto of the movement, the Letter from the Birmingham Jail.On the Washington front, President John Kennedy was preoccupied with attempting to thaw out the cold war relations with Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev, which also necessitated repairing the conflicting message the U.S was sending to the Soviets as well as the rest of the world that promoted the U.S as a bastion of freedom while treating a large segment of its population as third class citizens When photos of police dogs nipping at protesters many of them children and fire hoses blowing them across a street along with the clothes off their backs hit the national and international media, the Kennedys knew they had to do something to put out the conflagration.At the same time that the President and his brother Attorney General Robert Kennedy were trying to simultaneously placate and discourage Martin Luther King, the Attorney General was giving consent to J Edgar Hoover s campaign to wiretap King s calls and monitor his comings and goings to uncover the Communist connection that Hoover was certain was there somewhere.Change was seen as inevitable even among white leaders who saw Bull Connor as doingharm than good, not only through the fire hoses and dogs but by putting thousands of demonstrating school children in jail The only way they could oust him was by eliminating his office Even then, he was going to make the most of his remaining tenure.The Klan grew marginalized and no longer receiving unofficial consent from the city leaders and police force, which did not mean that their terrorist activities would abate The most extreme of the fanatics were as meticulous in their bomb making as chemists Bombings had occurred for a number of years, even church bombings although, to date, no one had been killed in any of them That is, until the morning of September 15 when a group of girls were in the basement putting on their robes for a choral performance in the upcoming morning church service Just after 10 that morning, at least ten sticks of dynamite placed against the foundation next to the wall exploded, blowing a massive hole in the side of the building and burying the girls in a mountain of wreckage McWhorter describes the long and protracted aftermath, including a comedy of errors investigation conducted by city and state and FBI officials, each trying to out scoop the other Utimately, in 1977, one of the bombers, Robert Chambliss, was sentenced and convicted on one count of murder It wasn t until 2001 that an incriminating tape of a conversation Thomas Blanton had with his wife in which he admitted to being involved in the bombing was admitted as evidence, convicting him on four counts of murder and a life sentence One year later, Bobby Cherry was convicted and sentenced to life imprisonment Concurrent with her account of the civil rights conflict of Birmingham, McWhorter recounts where she was in her life at the time In her ten year old conscience, in spite of her upbringing and her father s Saturday night civil rights meetings about which the rest of the family knew nothing, she knew something was wrong with this picture The murder of girls close to her age brought the tragedy closer to her realm of experience In writing this exhaustive account, she also attempts to uncover the extent to which her father may have been involved in Klan activities The most she gets out of him in later years when researching her book is that he knew many of these people and knew of many of their activities To her relief, he drew the line at killing anyone, especially innocent victims.Continuing the Tolstoy analogy, she includesepilogues than Tolstoy s opus, including afterwords, postscripts and a 2012 update including the contemporary effort in Alabama to marginalize the current minority, illegal immigrants, along with those who attempt to follow the avenues of legal immigration status Jim Crow has now become Juan Crow and the ethnic threat has largely supplanted the traditional racial threat She assesses the mindset of the native citizen of Birmingham who must reconcile him or herself to this violent past either by safely consigning it to the pages of history or asobering alternative, the long painful process of personal and regional introspection This massive account serves as a vital historical document as well as a therapeutic personal history for one of those natives


  8. says:

    McWhorter s family was all over the Birmingham map in 1963 her father was on the slippery slope from the gentry to the trailer park, and her uncle was an important lawyer and Big Mule, the name given to the citizens of Birmingham who actually controlled the town Part of the book feels a bit ungainly McWhorter will stop her narrative to let you know what her 11 year old self was experiencing during that tumultuous year It isn t until the end that she tries to uncover what her racist father wa McWhorter s family was all over the Birmingham map in 1963 her father was on the slippery slope from the gentry to the trailer park, and her uncle was an important lawyer and Big Mule, the name given to the citizens of Birmingham who actually controlled the town Part of the book feels a bit ungainly McWhorter will stop her narrative to let you know what her 11 year old self was experiencing during that tumultuous year It isn t until the end that she tries to uncover what her racist father was up to, and then it turns outnot much, if you define not much as not beating Freedom Riders or blowing up small children at the 16th Street Baptist Church The net impression is that she is trying to establish home girl credentials that will underpin her narrative.She needn t have bothered The book isthan capable of standing on the merits of McWhorter s research, which is so exhaustive that the reader will feel as though he has visited Birmingham She seems to have a burr under her saddle about the contrasting roles of Martin Luther King, Jr and Fred Shuttlesworth, a minister who was at the heart of the Movement that desegregated Birmingham that year King is always late to the party, or timid It is Shuttlesworth who leads the black citizens in boycotts of downtown businesses and sit ins at lunch counters It is the troubled James Bevel, then husband of Diane Nash, who conceives and executes the most effective and dangerous approach to the struggle He sends the young people into the streets, determined to be arrested until they have followed Gandhi s precept and filled the jails to overflowing There were so many dramatic events that year that the book overflows Wallace barring the door of the University of Alabama against the two African Americans who tried to attend that year there had been two women in the 1950s , routine bombings by the Klan, rallies, marches and it all leads to the church bombing eight short days after the March on Washington that August Four teen girls were killed in the basement of the Baptist Church, capping a murky collusion between various far right groups, the FBI and members of the Birmingham Police Department It would be ten years before anyone went to prison for the crime, and another 37 before the last two conspirators were charged No authority emerges from the story unscathed.Very interesting Recommended


  9. says:

    Good history of the civil rights movement in Birmingham starting in the 1930s when it was largely supported by the Communist Party Goes into a fair amount of detail on the early years and incredible detail for the events surrounding the 1963 actions and the KKK bombings Slow reading because it is dense with details but I think that is also its power and its great value It makes for a very rich history and is of enormous value of having synthesized information from interviews and historical re Good history of the civil rights movement in Birmingham starting in the 1930s when it was largely supported by the Communist Party Goes into a fair amount of detail on the early years and incredible detail for the events surrounding the 1963 actions and the KKK bombings Slow reading because it is dense with details but I think that is also its power and its great value It makes for a very rich history and is of enormous value of having synthesized information from interviews and historical records including police records and trial transcripts.Author gives a lot of inside information about the civil rights organzations, the KKK and other opponents, the FBI and their highly ambiguous role and the political figures at the local, state and national level.My one complaint is actually that it is too short It ends quickly after the culminating events for 1963 protests and bombings We know the aftermath at a national level civil rights legislation, etc but I would have been fascinated to know how Birmingham changed as a result


  10. says:

    Very good

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