!!> PDF / Epub ☆ Common Ground ✪ Author J. Anthony Lukas – Buyphenergan500.us

Common Ground Winner Of Different Awards, This Is A Story Of The Busing Crisis In Boston

!!> PDF / Epub ☆ Common Ground  ✪ Author J. Anthony Lukas – Buyphenergan500.us
  • Paperback
  • 688 pages
  • Common Ground
  • J. Anthony Lukas
  • English
  • 13 February 2019
  • 0394746163

    10 thoughts on “!!> PDF / Epub ☆ Common Ground ✪ Author J. Anthony Lukas – Buyphenergan500.us


  1. says:

    This may be the best non fiction book I have ever read It chronicles the lives of three families in Boston Irish American, African American and WASP don t mean that negatively from the night of the MLK riots in 1968 thru school desegregation It s a great read of lawyers but also a great read for anyone interested in city issues be they Boston s issues or any other urban areas Would recommend to anyone and have already bought it for several friends


  2. says:

    Lukas brings to life the chaos of Boston s school busing crisis and racial conflict of the 60s and 70s His poignant account contrasts the experiences of three families from different communities poor inner city black, poor inner city Irish, and middle class college educated white Tracing each family s ancestry he illustrates the evolution of each community s values and then shows us how those values guide the families and communities response to the crisis Throughout Lukas digresses to vig Lukas brings to life the chaos of Boston s school busing crisis and racial conflict of the 60s and 70s His poignant account contrasts the experiences of three families from different communities poor inner city black, poor inner city Irish, and middle class college educated white Tracing each family s ancestry he illustrates the evolution of each community s values and then shows us how those values guide the families and communities response to the crisis Throughout Lukas digresses to vignettes of politicians and community leaders Mayor Kevin White, School Board Chairman Louise Day Hicks, Federal Judge Arthur Garrity, Boston Globe Editor Tom Winship, Cardinal Cushing, Cardinal Medeiros andHe also touches on national figures offering little tidbits on Joe and Ted Kennedy, Tip O Neil, John McCormack even George McGovern and Jimmy Carter The vignettes show us how ineffective, incapable and unprepared Boston s leaders were in handling the turmoil.Despite frequent interruptions to profile city leaders, the family stories are compelling We feel and sympathize with each family s hopes and fears We understand their differing perspectives and why their positions make sense even though they conflict with each other In this respect the book is a great accomplishment Unfortunately we are not left with hope rather we are left only with the intractability of the problem of fear and racial conflict The social disparities that had taken centuries to develop were not going to be solved in neat quick strokes Even though well intentioned, outsiders imposing formalistic solutions on the disadvantaged and dysfunctional were not going to achieve results Eventually everyone began to realize this, but there were no answers Today with the turmoil in Ferguson as a fresh reminder, solutions still appear distant


  3. says:

    This is a masterpiece of a book It is about Boston in the 1970s, though if it had been described to me only as such I m sure I wouldn t have picked it up Instead, it was lent to me by a good friend who recommended it highly.Reading Common Ground felt a lot like watching The Wire, and I can t help but wonder whether David Simon read Lukas book and was influenced by it CG is not as focused on crime per se as is The Wire, but it is a similar and similarly successful attempt to tell the st This is a masterpiece of a book It is about Boston in the 1970s, though if it had been described to me only as such I m sure I wouldn t have picked it up Instead, it was lent to me by a good friend who recommended it highly.Reading Common Ground felt a lot like watching The Wire, and I can t help but wonder whether David Simon read Lukas book and was influenced by it CG is not as focused on crime per se as is The Wire, but it is a similar and similarly successful attempt to tell the story of the city through telling the stories of the characters Lukas does a good job of portraying the Divers, the Twymons, and the McGoffs as relatable and interesting characters, while also subtly showing the ways in which each is acted upon by the larger forces of race, class, politics, the justice system, the educational system, etc I think Lukas intends to tell the story as a classical tragedy in which the city is in some sense the protagonist, and the imposition of busing the tragic flaw or mistake That s not to say that it s a polemical book one of the things that makes it so tragic is that busing was so well intentioned and it s not at all clear if another course of action would have been any better But by the end of the book, bad things that happen to the characters seem basically inevitable Of course, the flaw went even deeper than busing Lukas writes the backstories of the characters as far back as possible, often into the 1800s and 1700s So much of the tension in Boston in the 20th century seems to trace back ultimately to the mass migrations of Irish and of freed slaves The punishments for the crimes of England and the South seem to be visited upon Boston, for the transgression of opening itself to the refugees


  4. says:

    Several years ago, I was asked to give a Common Ground tour to a friend recently, in my current job, I got the assignment of working on a grant at the Charlestown Housing Development so have spent a fair amount of time there It has changed a lot since Lukas wrote the book, serving families from many ethnic backgrounds.The book is compelling It is a very odd experience reading this book as many of the characters in this book are individuals I have he Several years ago, I was asked to give a Common Ground tour to a friend recently, in my current job, I got the assignment of working on a grant at the Charlestown Housing Development so have spent a fair amount of time there It has changed a lot since Lukas wrote the book, serving families from many ethnic backgrounds.The book is compelling It is a very odd experience reading this book as many of the characters in this book are individuals I have heard about my entire life, and my father was interviewed by the author What makes Lukas story compelling is the way he shows the motivation of different factions within Boston, a city divided by race, by neighborhood, and by ambition Sadly, the angriest people in this book would have been better off fighting for better schools than fighting each other s race inspired fears


  5. says:

    This is a book that I had to read for a college course and I thought it was okay, but it really took a long time to get through and I didn t care that much in the end But when I read it again after college, I realized how great it really is It takes a look at three families one poor black family, one poor Irish family, and one young well off, idealistic Yankee family The book explores how they deal with each other during Boston s bussing crises of the 1970 s Admittedly, there is a LOT of This is a book that I had to read for a college course and I thought it was okay, but it really took a long time to get through and I didn t care that much in the end But when I read it again after college, I realized how great it really is It takes a look at three families one poor black family, one poor Irish family, and one young well off, idealistic Yankee family The book explores how they deal with each other during Boston s bussing crises of the 1970 s Admittedly, there is a LOT of detail given about each family s history, and it can get tiresome, but it s worth it In the end, this book is about racism, classism, gentrification, and sometimes failed idealism If this floats your boat, check it out But be warned it s pretty long


  6. says:

    I was looking for Boston books when I picked up Common Ground and I think it must be number 1 The failure of busing is at the center, but that narrative constantly gets sidetracked by dives into real lives and intergenerational looks at how people interact with Boston and each other The hundreds of stories about those people, and their bosses, friends, neighbors etc are the best part of the book Busing is used pretty effectively to examine urban poverty and race relations in America, but L I was looking for Boston books when I picked up Common Ground and I think it must be number 1 The failure of busing is at the center, but that narrative constantly gets sidetracked by dives into real lives and intergenerational looks at how people interact with Boston and each other The hundreds of stories about those people, and their bosses, friends, neighbors etc are the best part of the book Busing is used pretty effectively to examine urban poverty and race relations in America, but Lukas is too evenhanded for my millennial mind and when he gets close to trying to provide a big answer the book backs up into overcooked cliche eg Here were two great institutions, the Executive and the Judiciary, confronting each other head on Each had profoundly different values a Mayor, the supreme politician, for whom everything was ultimately negotiable, and a Judge, the supreme moralist, for whom constitutional rights were simply not negotiable Sitting there, one realized that there was no way these two could accommodate their differences A collision was inevitable, as predestined as Oedipus sleeping with his mother and murdering his father. Lukas says a big thank you to Diane Ravitch in the end acknowledgements for her insights into the complex relationship between community and equality, so if you feel confused about inequality in this country maybe just spendtime with her This book is much better at showing than telling There are unbelievable stories about the news business, presidential campaigns, gentrification, political gamesmanship and city machines, policing, philanthropy, traffic patterns, music, immigration, the Catholic Church, and, of course, race Here s one quick example, drawn from the central narrative of Common Ground Spring 1976 was the end of the second year of busing White students at Charlestown High School had been protesting the policy and the presence of a handful of black students at the school since it began, and a few were arrested after a particularly disruptive demonstration in the middle of the school year In April, over a hundred white students and adults from Charlestown went to the Mayor s office to appeal the arrest, where they were rebuffed, sending them angrily towards the Federal Courthouse where they hoped to speak directly to the judge who had originally devised the policy As they walked over they ran into Ted Landsmark, a black graduate of Yale and Yale Law School, who had recently left a prestigious firm to represent a trade association for black construction workers He was headed to a meeting at City Hall when he was set upon and beaten by the crowd of Townies A Boston Herald photographer took a picture of the attack that won the Pulitzer Prize for Spot News Photography in America s bicentennial year


  7. says:

    My favorite genre is non fiction, though it isn t easy to find a good selection Either the author gets the history right but he she can t write, or the author is a good writer but gets the history wrong Common Ground by J Anthony Lukas, is a Pulitzer Prize winning masterpiece about an event in the 1960 s and 1970 s that nearly brought the great city of Boston, Massachusetts, to its knees It narrates the story of how a well meaning judge decided that the public schools in Boston were de facto My favorite genre is non fiction, though it isn t easy to find a good selection Either the author gets the history right but he she can t write, or the author is a good writer but gets the history wrong Common Ground by J Anthony Lukas, is a Pulitzer Prize winning masterpiece about an event in the 1960 s and 1970 s that nearly brought the great city of Boston, Massachusetts, to its knees It narrates the story of how a well meaning judge decided that the public schools in Boston were de facto segregated, and he ordered that they be integrated immediately The book relates the story of three families and how this decision affected them The Twymon s, an African American family living in Mattapan, were excited by the move,as it might improve the education for their children The schools in Mattapan, a conclave of Boston, were surely inferior to those in some other parts of the city The McGoffs, a white family residing in Charlestown, another part of Boston, viewed the decision as an attempt to change the dynamics of the town and saw the new students scheduled to be bussed of their schools as interlopers Even today, Charlestown is a close knit part of the city where residents refer to each other as Townies Finally, we meet the Divers, well meaning do gooders who move into the battle ground so as not to be seen also as merley do gooders, unaffected by the decision What binds this book together are the wonderful characters and authentic settings, right in the shadow of the Bunker Hill Monument Lukas manages to reach not only into the local politics and lifestyles, but his book extends all the way to Washington and to the Camelot that is the Kennedy legacy Common Ground is a page turner, an authentic look at one of the most tumultuous times in American history If you like non fiction, this is a must read It will change the way you look at both education in America and how politics ofter have nothing to do with what is right


  8. says:

    This is one of the best nonfiction books I ve ever read, and an essential books for anyone interested in the complex ways that race and class play out in American cities and in education Watching David Simon s excellent HBO mini series Show Me a Hero inspired me to pick up Common Ground again, and I m grateful that I did One is about court ordered desegregation of public housing in Yonkers, the other about court ordered busing in Boston What strikes me about both works is the utter intrac This is one of the best nonfiction books I ve ever read, and an essential books for anyone interested in the complex ways that race and class play out in American cities and in education Watching David Simon s excellent HBO mini series Show Me a Hero inspired me to pick up Common Ground again, and I m grateful that I did One is about court ordered desegregation of public housing in Yonkers, the other about court ordered busing in Boston What strikes me about both works is the utter intractability of the law when it imposed desegregation Judge Sand in Yonkers and Garrity in Boston were emphatic that segregation could not stand and did not care in the least that in both cities, the people, the cops, the political will were not caught up.In Common Ground, Lukas is sympathetic with the efforts of the law to bring equality in education, but also understands the cost to white ethnics whose way of life is utterly upended, and to the politicians who have to deal with busing Busing utterly ruins Kevin White, for example, the most tragic figure in the book.Lukas book is written with great empathy towards the families that had to deal with busing, especially the McGoffs and their Irish American friends I have never read a truer examination of the white ethnic communities in urban late 20th century America The roughest part of the book has to do with the Divers, idealistic Harvard grads who want to remake the city as a progressive melting pot, only to be utterly frustrated by the intractable problems of crime I look at my Brooklyn and the mad rush to gentrify and wring he last penny by developers and I truly feel that the Divers dream of a multi racial urban life has become a dream of the past


  9. says:

    Took me so long to read, because it s 650 pages and teensy text, but well worth it especially for educators working in Boston.


  10. says:

    This book is a real waste and a missed opportunity The fact that it is one of the most recommended books on Boston history, as well as a Pulitzer winner, is both egregious and concerning Lukas spends close to 700 pages examining the desegregation of Boston public schools and has almost nothing to show for it There are no citations, only an acknowledgement of people interviewed Rather than ground his research in primary sources, statistical analysis, existing studies, or a wide variety of ane This book is a real waste and a missed opportunity The fact that it is one of the most recommended books on Boston history, as well as a Pulitzer winner, is both egregious and concerning Lukas spends close to 700 pages examining the desegregation of Boston public schools and has almost nothing to show for it There are no citations, only an acknowledgement of people interviewed Rather than ground his research in primary sources, statistical analysis, existing studies, or a wide variety of anecdotes across the ideological spectrum he picks three archetypal families and bends the history of the housing crisis to fit a cliched narrative in line with local clan legends One of the most appalling aspects of the book is his treatment of the McGoff family Rather than present their racist activism as the ugly consequence of historical circumstance, he actually situates them so sympathetically that he almost suggest they aren t racist at all only fiercely loyal Americans acting in accordance with some sort of Charlestown tradition, victims of an out of touch bureaucracy.Equally infuriating is that while he devotes chapter upon chapter to excusing these racist reactionaries, he gives no voice to the countless black activists that fought racism and worked to end segregation in the city The actual history and politics of the era are depoliticized and reduced to a character drama where the central villain is made out to be Judge Garrity In lieu of analysis of public policy successes failures, what the reader gets is a Bostonian version of the The Wire written by a center right David Simon under the guise of neutrality While it might make for entertaining reading, it offends the concept of history while working to distort it.I highly recommend that everyone interested in this book read Robert Dentler s essay Boston School Desegregation The Fallowness of Common Ground available for free here Read it, ESPECIALLY if you liked the book It articulates some much needed criticism of Common Ground with an impressive and convincing clarity Dentler helped Garrity draft the busing plan, so he is by no means neutral, but his points illustrate the myriad problems with Lukas magnum opus Reading a selection of Common Ground along with this essay would be an excellent starting point for an introductory historiographic classroom session

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *