!!> Epub ➢ Is There No Place on Earth for Me? ➡ Author Susan Sheehan – Buyphenergan500.us

Is There No Place on Earth for Me? Sylvia Frumkin, A Highly Intelligent Young Girl, Became A Schizophrenic In Her Late Teens And Spent Most Of The Next Seventeen Years In And Out Of Mental Institutions Susan Sheehan, A Talented Reporter, Followed Sylvia For Almost A Year Talking With And Observing Her, Listening To Her Monologues, Sitting In On Consultations With Doctors Even For A Period Sleeping In The Bed Next To Her In A Psychiatric Hospital

!!> Epub ➢ Is There No Place on Earth for Me?  ➡ Author Susan Sheehan – Buyphenergan500.us
  • Paperback
  • 352 pages
  • Is There No Place on Earth for Me?
  • Susan Sheehan
  • English
  • 21 July 2017
  • 0394713788

    10 thoughts on “!!> Epub ➢ Is There No Place on Earth for Me? ➡ Author Susan Sheehan – Buyphenergan500.us


  1. says:

    Susan Sheehan journalist made a study in the 1980s of Sylvia Frumkin, a mental patient diagnosed with schizophrenia who was hospitalized multiple times at various locations in and around New York She spent most of her later teenage years 1970s and early adulthood in and out of hospitals, dealing with auditory hallucinations, disorganized thoughts, violent and anti social behaviors, and a host of other problems brought on by her illness Sheehan interviewed the patient Miss Frumkin , family Susan Sheehan journalist made a study in the 1980s of Sylvia Frumkin, a mental patient diagnosed with schizophrenia who was hospitalized multiple times at various locations in and around New York She spent most of her later teenage years 1970s and early adulthood in and out of hospitals, dealing with auditory hallucinations, disorganized thoughts, violent and anti social behaviors, and a host of other problems brought on by her illness Sheehan interviewed the patient Miss Frumkin , family members her parents and sister, Joyce , Sylvia s doctors, therapists, psychiatrists, and others whose lives were touched by her illness in order to create this portrait of Sylvia and the mental hospital environment at that time Sheehan paints a picture of a chaotic and largely disorganized system not unlike Sylvia s illness The state mental hospitals like Creedmoor were largely overpopulated and under staffed It was difficult to give patients the attention or care that they needed and in some cases craved Most of the doctors were foreign born and educated and there were cultural and language barriers between them and their patients Prevailing practices and attitudes regarding the medication of patients were to put patients on several different medications at a time, and then wean them off of them as their symptoms psychoses improved or if side effects became too uncomfortable Because doctors didn t really understand how the medications worked, and because the individual metabolisms and physiologies of their patients meant they worked differently for everyone and often differently at different times over patients lifetimes , this was sort of a crapshoot In Sylvia s case, these practices probably made her illness worse doctors didn t know or bother to become familiar with her case history, she wasn t given enough of medications to actually control her symptoms, and life on the ward and at home was incredibly stressful for her Sylvia is often described as pesty and irritating by those who knew her, and she often resorted to violence when she was frustrated When she was able to control these impulses, she could be quite affable and charming, and she struck people as being particularly bright In an afterword, Susan Sheehan writes that after publication of this book, Sylvia s condition improved and she was able to go home to live It s difficult to believe that this period of wellness lasted any longer than others, but publicity after publication brought her to the attention of a prominent psychiatrist, who took on her case personally, so perhaps she s finally receiving the care and attention she needs.I m still mystified by the workings of schizophrenia, which seems to be a catch all for various mental illnesses that can t be classified elsewhere, but which share certain similarities I think the hardest thing to come to terms with both for me and for psychiatrists during Sylvia s time is that schizophrenia can t be cured It can only be treated The bad behavior of schizophrenics seems like something that an ordinary person could easily control the impulses, the violence, the acting out Why is it that some people are overwhelmed by these things and other normal people can deal with the same stresses and not have a psychotic break There was one point where Sylvia really seemed to understand what was going on in her life when she was seeing a therapist a young woman, to whom she could relate who understood her problems, was honest with her, and was able to get her to work on being her own individual person Other doctors seemed to think they could improve her condition solely by throwing drugs at it and then never enough medication to actually help her Part of me wonders whether Sylvia was just a self indulgent, irritating pip who never learned to deal with the strength of her emotions Is that all that mental illness is Or was she seriously crippled by a chemical imbalance dopamine uptake deficiency After reading this, I d like to find somethingrecent that gets into the whys and hows of schizophrenia I hope some progress has been made since the 1980s


  2. says:

    Excellent inside look at how and why the system often fails the mentally and emotionally disturbed people it s suppose to be helping Sylvia was shuffled in and out of facilities, her medication was changed almost every time she entered a new facility So many of these doctors basically threw a dart blindly at the question of medication Only one doctor ever took the time to read her treatment history to properly assess her medication needs I felt pity for her parents and her sister Although I Excellent inside look at how and why the system often fails the mentally and emotionally disturbed people it s suppose to be helping Sylvia was shuffled in and out of facilities, her medication was changed almost every time she entered a new facility So many of these doctors basically threw a dart blindly at the question of medication Only one doctor ever took the time to read her treatment history to properly assess her medication needs I felt pity for her parents and her sister Although I also believe Sylvia s parents made alot of the situations worse, I understand that caring for an emotionally unstable adult who is violent and unable to comprehend logic and reason is often times impossible and sometimes you get fed up and make wrong decisions No one can be expected to always handle volatile situations the right way I pitied Sylvia, and I hated her at times and then immediately felt guilty for hating her, knowing she really couldn t help her actions, but mostly, I wanted Sylvia to get help I wanted just one person in the mental health system to take the time to figure out her best course of treatment and not throw up their hands and say they can t help and pawn her off on the next facility I found many decisions by the mental health facilities to be grossly irresponsible I hope Sylvia eventually got the help she needed


  3. says:

    This is a detailed account of a bright but unfortunate schizophrenic Like many other stories about people with this mental illness, this one is very uncomfortable to read and reminds us very much of what we, asmentally well off human beings, all take for granted Perhaps what is the most unsettling for me to see is how most of the psychiatrists, therapists, and high professionals in this field were so confused, inconsistent, and insensitive in dealing with schizophrenic patients who were This is a detailed account of a bright but unfortunate schizophrenic Like many other stories about people with this mental illness, this one is very uncomfortable to read and reminds us very much of what we, asmentally well off human beings, all take for granted Perhaps what is the most unsettling for me to see is how most of the psychiatrists, therapists, and high professionals in this field were so confused, inconsistent, and insensitive in dealing with schizophrenic patients who were unresponsive to medications like Sylvia It is also troubling that very few of them did spend any time to consider the patient s medical history before writing off an prescription that often repeated the ones that did little help Moreover, a great deal of this book presents how dull and horrible life could get in a mental hospital in the 60s and 70s and how much a psychological and financial strain it sucked from a family to have a child adult with schizophrenia This is a sad story to learn and it makes it hard to forget the devastating seriousness of this mental illness


  4. says:

    Clear a spot on your calendar because this book will completely absorb you for 48 hours A writer follows the frustrating and jagged path of a schizophrenic woman through the New York mental health system over decades Originally appearing as serial articles, the text was never given a vigorous re edit, so the chronology is a little confusing However, I think this enhances the merry go round heartbreak of this woman s life institutional admissions, bad drug therapy, huffy exits, broken beginni Clear a spot on your calendar because this book will completely absorb you for 48 hours A writer follows the frustrating and jagged path of a schizophrenic woman through the New York mental health system over decades Originally appearing as serial articles, the text was never given a vigorous re edit, so the chronology is a little confusing However, I think this enhances the merry go round heartbreak of this woman s life institutional admissions, bad drug therapy, huffy exits, broken beginnings, failed ventures, and exasperated family The family in this case is thankful to push foropenness about the nature and social responses to mental illness If you have anyone in your life who ever struggled to stay mentally healthy for any reason, you should read this book


  5. says:

    Marvelously researched and riveting from start to finish They don t make nonfiction like this any A gripping and heart rending portrayal of one woman s nearly lifelong struggle with schizophrenia.


  6. says:

    This was a poignant picture of the Mental Health system in the late 70s and early 80s A young girl and her family struggle with schizophrenia How she was misdiagnosed and not treated correctly The stigmatism that comes with mental health It hits close to home, having a brother who has a mental health disease and spent much of his young adult life in a State Hospital Hopefully, the mental health system has corrected the problems that occurred in that time I still see people with mental he This was a poignant picture of the Mental Health system in the late 70s and early 80s A young girl and her family struggle with schizophrenia How she was misdiagnosed and not treated correctly The stigmatism that comes with mental health It hits close to home, having a brother who has a mental health disease and spent much of his young adult life in a State Hospital Hopefully, the mental health system has corrected the problems that occurred in that time I still see people with mental health diseases slipping through the system even today I see poly pharmacy in the practice of treating mental health illnesses today It is one of my biggest battles as pharmacist I still think there is a long way to go in treating people with mental health illnesses and the mental health system and the way medications are used to treat mental health illnesses


  7. says:

    It was interesting to look at psychiatric treatment and how ideas about inpatient versus outpatient treatment evolved with the introduction of newer antipsychotics The main character s experience of constantly going in and out of hospitals is still a problem that lasts today despite newer atypicals I do wish the author had put the story in chronological order as it got rather confusing when the story started at a certain point and then went back in time and then went forward again Also, I wis It was interesting to look at psychiatric treatment and how ideas about inpatient versus outpatient treatment evolved with the introduction of newer antipsychotics The main character s experience of constantly going in and out of hospitals is still a problem that lasts today despite newer atypicals I do wish the author had put the story in chronological order as it got rather confusing when the story started at a certain point and then went back in time and then went forward again Also, I wish the author had added a piece that described how she got involved with this patient especially given how closely she was following I was really interested in that aspect of the book and her experiences and I thought it merited a mention even if it wasn t the focus of the book However, it really wasn t brought up at all


  8. says:

    Despite the absolutely awful cover art for this book, the writing itself is wonderful The narrative focuses on the story of Sylvia it is true, so it s not really a story, since it s her life , who is one part normal twenty something girl, one part sad mental health patient, and one part Little Edie guess which parts are the most entertaining to read However, Sheehan who was a reporter when she undertook the writing of the book , also writes about the hospital Sylvia spends most of her ti Despite the absolutely awful cover art for this book, the writing itself is wonderful The narrative focuses on the story of Sylvia it is true, so it s not really a story, since it s her life , who is one part normal twenty something girl, one part sad mental health patient, and one part Little Edie guess which parts are the most entertaining to read However, Sheehan who was a reporter when she undertook the writing of the book , also writes about the hospital Sylvia spends most of her time in, the medications she is prescribed, and the various treatments she is subjected to Since this is all taking place in the seventies, a lot of the standard mental health care seems positively stone age Equally disturbing is the public opinion and misconception of mental illness, which Sylvia feels acutely I would like a follow up, as Sylvia uh oh Have to work


  9. says:

    Although this book is an interesting and long case study of schizophrenia, it also deals with some of the negative aspects of mental health care brought on by the 60 s 70 s protests for patient s rights My only compaint would be that the author takes herself out of the narrative too much You can sense she has something to say, but she never comes out and says it.


  10. says:

    Sheehan captures loose associations in a way very few ever have This is a must read for anyone who wants to know what treatment for mental illness was like in one large hospital in the 1970 s It is an absolutely wonderful portrayal of active psychosis.

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