[Download] ➵ The Dead Hand Author David E. Hoffman – Buyphenergan500.us

The Dead Hand A Tour De Force Of Investigative History Steve Coll The Dead Hand Is The Suspense Filled Story Of The People Who Sought To Brake The Speeding Locomotive Of The Arms Race, Then Rushed To Secure The Nuclear And Biological Weapons Left Behind By The Collapse Of The Soviet Union A Dangerous Legacy That Haunts Us Even TodayThe Cold War Was An Epoch Of Massive Overkill In The Last Half Of The Twentieth Century The Two Superpowers Had Perfected The Science Of Mass Destruction And Possessed Nuclear Weapons With The Combined Power Of A Million Hiroshimas What S , A Soviet Biological Warfare Machine Was Ready To Produce Bacteria And Viruses To Sicken And Kill Millions In The Dead Hand, A Thrilling Narrative History Drawing On New Archives And Original Research And Interviews, David E Hoffman Reveals How Presidents, Scientists, Diplomats, Soldiers, And Spies Confronted The Danger And Changed The Course Of History The Dead Hand Captures The Inside Story In Both The United States And The Soviet Union, Giving Us An Urgent And Intimate Account Of The Last Decade Of The Arms Race With Access To Secret Kremlin Documents, Hoffman Chronicles Soviet Internal Deliberations That Have Long Been Hidden He Reveals That Weapons Designers In Laid A Massive Star Wars Program On The Desk Of Soviet Leader Mikhail Gorbachev To Compete With President Reagan, But Gorbachev Refused To Build It He Unmasks The Cover Up Of The Soviet Biological Weapons Program He Tells The Exclusive Story Of One Soviet Microbiologist S Quest To Build A Genetically Engineered Super Germ It Would Cause A Mild Illness, A Deceptive Recovery, Then A Second, Fatal Attack And He Details The Frightening History Of The Doomsday Machine, Known As The Dead Hand, Which Would Launch A Retaliatory Nuclear Strike If The Soviet Leaders Were Wiped Out When The Soviet Union Collapsed, The Dangers Remained Soon Rickety Trains Were Hauling Unsecured Nuclear Warheads Across The Russian Steppe Tons Of Highly Enriched Uranium And Plutonium Lay Unguarded In Warehouses And Microbiologists And Bomb Designers Were Scavenging For Food To Feed Their Families The Dead Hand Offers Fresh And Startling Insights Into Reagan And Gorbachev, The Two Key Figures Of The End Of The Cold War, And Draws Colorful, Unforgettable Portraits Of Many Others Who Struggled, Often Valiantly, To Save The World From The Most Terrifying Weapons Known To Man

[Download] ➵ The Dead Hand  Author David E. Hoffman – Buyphenergan500.us
  • Hardcover
  • 592 pages
  • The Dead Hand
  • David E. Hoffman
  • English
  • 25 July 2017
  • 0385524374

    10 thoughts on “[Download] ➵ The Dead Hand Author David E. Hoffman – Buyphenergan500.us


  1. says:

    I ll admit I picked this up because I am a fan of nuke porn I grew up reading the surprisingly subtle On the Beach, the over written, over sexed The Last Ship, and the ridiculous Ian Slater series WW III On television, I was thrilled by The Day After I ve never seen Steve Guttenberg the same, since I even downloaded On Thermonuclear War, just to see what precautions I could take step one don t get into a thermonuclear war there is no step two Some months ago, I read an article on the o I ll admit I picked this up because I am a fan of nuke porn I grew up reading the surprisingly subtle On the Beach, the over written, over sexed The Last Ship, and the ridiculous Ian Slater series WW III On television, I was thrilled by The Day After I ve never seen Steve Guttenberg the same, since I even downloaded On Thermonuclear War, just to see what precautions I could take step one don t get into a thermonuclear war there is no step two Some months ago, I read an article on the online newsite Slate called The Letter of Last Resort This letter is handwritten by the reigning British prime minister, and is essentially a Roman thumbs up thumbs down in the event the minister is killed by a nuclear strike The letter is kept in a safe in a nuclear submarine and tells the captain what to do if his country has already been destroyed i.e., to fire off the missles or call it a day The concept of the letter of last resort is intertwined with the titular dead hand of David Hoffman s book on the untold story of the Cold War arms race The dead hand, in its purest, theoretical form, is a device out of Dr Strangelove It is a system of radiation sensors, seismographs, and computer linked communications that would fire off the Soviet Union s missiles in the event a first strike decapitated the leadership Essentially, a nuclear war could be started, waged, and completed without a human being ever pushing a button It is a chilling thought, one that compelled me to purchase this book Except there was never any such Doomsday Device It never progressed beyond the thought stage What the Soviets did create was called The Perimeter It used communication rockets to communicate with its nuclear arsenal, and could launch a retaliatory strike after low level human input This is not nearly so frightening or interesting as a true dead hand Moreover, only about six or seven pages is spent on The Perimeter And in fairness to the New York Times, The Perimeter was written about as long ago as 1994 Instead The Dead Hand feels like a lot of research in search of a narrative It claims to be about the Cold War arms race, and it has a lot of new information on the Soviets biological weapons program However, the great bulk of the book is devoted to rehashing the final decades of the Cold War I imagine the author doing all these interviews, combing all these archives, coming up with all these tidbits, then wondering what to do with it all In the end, it seems like he took this new material and appended it to an already told story The Dead Hand starts promisingly enough, with an anthrax outbreak that is swept under the rug by Soviet officials After that intriguing prologue, though, the book returns to a well worn path It details the waning term of Leonid Brezhnev, who kept madly spending on defense and pushing the Soviet economy to the brink What follows is a greatest hits of the Cold War The shootdown of KAL 007 the rise of Gorbachev the grand designs of Reagan interesting how conservatives attack Barack Obama s naivete in wanting to get rid of all nuclear weapons, while their patron saint Ronnie crusaded for the exact same thing the Reykjavic summit perestroika and glasnost arms control the fall of the Soviet Union and American attempts to secure the Russian arsenal This is all well trod ground The old stuff is interspersed with a lot of detail a lot about the USSR s biological weapons program To be sure, the program was dastardly, and to use Reagan s calculation, evil Soviet scientists went so far as to work on viruses that would cause a person to get sick, let them get better, then hit them with a second, lethal phase Still, the idea of state owned biological weapons is not as frightful when compared to nuclear weapons, since the latter make the former obsolete That is, why would a nation state use a weapon that could make a bunch of people sick over the course of many weeks when you could simply lob a missle and get the same results instantly More terrifying is the possibility that these scientists might still be out there for sale to rogue nations or terrorists, and it was interesting to see the programs put in place to try to hire these Russians and keep them out of trouble The narrative is constantly jumping from one mile marker to the next, without ever finding that thread to pull all the events together I was annoyed at certain parts when Hoffman would start a story then just drop it and move on For instance, when talking about the year of the spies, he tells the story of an American agent arrested in Moscow You learn that the agent s Soviet contact was executed, but you never learn the agent s fate I went to the internet to learn the agent was released the same day Mostly I was disappointed with what the cover promised to deliver I thought I was going to read about a Doomsday weapon, with all the attendant risks and hypotheticals Instead, I read about a lot of things I already knew With the recent anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall, there have been a spate of Cold War books This was the first I picked That will teach me to buy a book solely on a cool title and a picture of a missile on the front cover


  2. says:

    This book was a fantastic recounting of the Cold War It was extremely factual, and did well in citing all of the sources for each piece of information and story that made this book non fiction.I always found the Cold War as this mysterious time period where we somehow miraculously avoided nuclear annihilation by coming up with Mutually Assured Destruction However, Hoffman really gives us an in depth and intimate look at how MAD came about I was left intrigued as I learned about what the Dead This book was a fantastic recounting of the Cold War It was extremely factual, and did well in citing all of the sources for each piece of information and story that made this book non fiction.I always found the Cold War as this mysterious time period where we somehow miraculously avoided nuclear annihilation by coming up with Mutually Assured Destruction However, Hoffman really gives us an in depth and intimate look at how MAD came about I was left intrigued as I learned about what the Dead Hand really was, how close we came to destruction and how it got that close, along with tons of other covert operations that, most likely, would never have been brought to light The fact that Hoffman compiles all this valuable information into a solid and factual recounting of how both governments handled nuclear arms, well, lets just say that it s wonderful somebody like Hoffman took the time and effort to do that.The book itself is very interesting, starting off with a good hook hint it involves anthrax and then invites the reader into the White House for a look at the Reagan administration Hoffman kept the book interesting and accurate by narrating a wide array of characters, never lingering with one specific person too long While this book is hefty, it s because it goes into great detail about covert operations on both sides of the Cold War It does so while maintaining interest, and it s well written as well The level is definitely above teen, something an adult would read A good comparison would probably be New York Times level reading.I wouldn t really recommend this book to any of my peers, because this book requires not only an advanced reading level, but a strong interest in the Cold War, otherwise the reader will have trouble understanding and or lose interest However, if a well rounded reader is looking for a Cold War book, I would DEFINITELY recommend it as a reliable and trustworthy source of information on the Cold War


  3. says:

    The second half of the twentieth century will always be defined by what became known as The Cold War Born out of the distrust between the major allied powers in the Second World War, the standoff between the Soviet Union and the United States not only gave shape to the modern world, it also created two weapons building programs unrivaled in history Ultra secret programs that produced weapons that are too horrifying to imagine and created consequences for those who chose to create them And whi The second half of the twentieth century will always be defined by what became known as The Cold War Born out of the distrust between the major allied powers in the Second World War, the standoff between the Soviet Union and the United States not only gave shape to the modern world, it also created two weapons building programs unrivaled in history Ultra secret programs that produced weapons that are too horrifying to imagine and created consequences for those who chose to create them And while those weapons were never actually employed in the war that luckily never happened, it wasn t for lack of trying And even now, the shadow of those military programs lives on in spite of the end of the Soviet Union In fact, things might bedangerous now than they were at the height of the Cold War.David Hoffman s inside look at the Cold War arms race and its consequences is in a word frightening Those of us who grew up in that time remember the fear that pervaded us that one day we would wake up to cities being incinerated by nuclear warheads and that would be the end of that However, until I read The Dead Hand, I didn t really appreciate just how close to the brink of World War III we came Forget the Cuban Missile Crisis We never came closer to calamity than during a few weeks in 1983 and few knew anything about it until decades later The Dead Hand goes far beyond simply documenting how weapons of mass destruction nuclear, chemical and biological shaped policy between the superpowers It describes just how perilously close we came at several points to all out Armageddon Hoffman provides a wealth of information from sources on all sides of the Cold War Evenchilling is how even today we are haunted by the legacy of destructive arsenals even though the two primary combatants no longer have a beef with each other The industry of the two superpowers are now the deadly tools that rough states and terrorists would love to grab a hold of and just one would alter our world forever That is not to say The Dead Hand is perfect At times, Hoffman s writing becomes a bit repetitive, at other times he drones on about minor things However, the overall portrait he paints is both thoughtful and chilling Hoffman doesn t end with a litany of conclusions or things that need to be done Ultimately, there are no easy answers to the world we have built other than a need to be vigilant about allowing paranoia and fear to push into acting in a devastating way The tools of our protection can become the instruments of our destruction The Dead Hand is a must read for anyone who lived through the anxiety of the Cold War or wants to know what threatens our way of life today The Cold War might be over, but the threats to humanity still remain Well written and frankly unnerving


  4. says:

    Lai piedod man tas cilv ks, kur man ieteica izlas t o gr matu, tas bija sen un tviter Gr mata man las t j st v ja labu laiku gaid dama savu k rtu, kaut k p c t s ieg des bija p rg jis entuziasms las t par Auksto karu Visp r jau nebija t , ka uzreiz p rg ja, pirmaj pieg jien t l t p c ieg des es k das p rdesmit lappuses piev r ju, bet neielas jos un atliku v l kam laikam.Par Aukst kara laikiem ir sarakst tas simtiem gr matu, s kot no piln giem izdom jumiem un beidzot ar protokolu p rdru Lai piedod man tas cilv ks, kur man ieteica izlas t o gr matu, tas bija sen un tviter Gr mata man las t j st v ja labu laiku gaid dama savu k rtu, kaut k p c t s ieg des bija p rg jis entuziasms las t par Auksto karu Visp r jau nebija t , ka uzreiz p rg ja, pirmaj pieg jien t l t p c ieg des es k das p rdesmit lappuses piev r ju, bet neielas jos un atliku v l kam laikam.Par Aukst kara laikiem ir sarakst tas simtiem gr matu, s kot no piln giem izdom jumiem un beidzot ar protokolu p rdruk m Par to, k prezidenti, spiegi, zin tnieki, diplom ti un p rb dz ji dar ja visu iesp jamo, lai samazin tu potenci l s kodolkatastrofas draudus Starp ab m lielvar m vald ja savstarp ja neuztic ba, paranoja un abas puses pamatoti uzskat ja, ka pretinieks savus stos nodomus sl pj un, t lojot miera balodi, pa kluso ra o papildus iero us Autors ir izmantojis to, ka da a no biju s PSRS slepenajiem dokumentiem tiku i atslepenoti un m in jis p c iesp jas apkopot Aukst kara beigu f zes dokumentus vien st st.Visp r jau par v stures gr matu k t du atsauksmi ir diezgan gr ti uzrakst t Ja neesi speci lists v stures posm , par kuru lasi, tad atliek vien uztic ties autoram im autoram uztic ties var, jo katram faktam vi ir kl t pielicis atsauci Ja esi pavisam knauzer gs las t js, tad n ktos doties pie pirmavota un p rliecin ties, ka atsauce atbilst paties bai Ta u ar pliku faktu uzskait anu nek da gr mata nesan k, autoram ir j veido ar faktu lo isks izkl sts st st jums Ta u jebkur st st jums paredz faktu interpret ciju ietami lo isk sec b Tas t d , ka cilv ka smadzenes mums ir t iek rtotas, jebkur notikums taj s tiek p rveidots k c lo sakar gs izkl sts Tas, ka realit tei ds uztveres veids ir visnota neatbilst gs, ir m su pa u probl ma Ar aj jom autors ir centies, cik var dams, neizv l ties puses un apskat t Aukst kara beigu procesus objekt vi Tas gan vi am k Rietumu kult ras p rst vim nesan k un PSRS beigu beig s san k sliktie.ASV un PSRS centr l Aukst kara strat ija bija attur t pretinieku no uzbrukuma Uzbrukums noz m tu prettriecienu, un tas savuk rt abu karojo o bloku izn cin anu Kodolarsen li bija pietieko i, galven r pe bija nodro in t prettriecienu gad jum , ja pav les dev ji ietu boj pirms sp tu dot pav li palaist ra etes J atz m , ka vismaz aj jom manai b rn bas valstij PSRS bija izcila ideja vienk r a un eni la, t garant ja to, ka pat ja izn cin tu visus galvenos, tik un t naidnieks ASV no prettrieciena neizvair tos Praktiski jebkur dz vi paliku ais bunkurs var tu palaist speci lu ra eti, kura p rlidojot PSRS teritoriju autonomi iedarbin tu pirmo triecienu p rdz vojo os kodoliero us Ta u ne jau tikai kodoliero i bija lielvaru galven s r pes, v l jau ir biolo iskie un miskie iero i PSRS specializ j s Sib rijas m ra kultiv an un baku att st an ASV vismaz p c autora apgalvojuma no diem projektiem jau sen bija atsac jusies Biolo iskie iero i kaujas lauk ir absol ti neder gi, jo iedarbojas tikai p c p ris dien m To galvenais m r is ir civiliedz vot ji PSRS bija diezgan daudz slepenu laboratoriju, kur s tika dar ts viss iesp jamais, lai dus iero us pilnveidotu Tas nekas, ka PSRS en tik atpalika p r desmitgadi, ja ir pietiekami resursi, tad var visu miskie iero i bija piesaukti pavisam maz, tik vien, ka PSRS vi i glab jas pa roku galam, t pat k kodoliero i.Gr matas galvenok rt ir centr ta uz PSRS, ir is tas par ASV, bet 70% ir velt ti PSRS beigu gadiem Tas rad ja zin mu disbalansu, un piln gi ita, ka amerik i ir piln gi miera atbalst t ji Bu a un Reigana rpolitikas agresivit te vair k esot bijusi k PSRS procesu nesapra anas c lonis nevis eopolitiska nepiecie am ba T d m s daudz las m par padomju l deriem, par Gorba ova perestroiku un PSRS milit r kompleksa nev l anos str d t re las ekonomikas apst k os Gr matai lieku 9 no 10 ball m Las t gan es ieteiktu tiem, kurus patiesi interes Aukst kara beigu posms, t l dz s kumiem, ko kur kad teica, kad k ds p rb ga un citi s kumi Ja is v stures posms Tevi neinteres , tad it s dikti garlaic ga K jau vis m v stures gr mat m pien kas gala v rt jums nav tik daudz autora objektivit te, cik las t ja pa a dz ves laik uzkr t inform cija liel koties bez atsauc m un pa st riem sagr bst ta un p rliec ba par paties bu


  5. says:

    I thought this book would likely be boring but no Hoffman starts with a bang and generally kept me turning the pages I did not remember all the Russian names, but I didn t have to, as some clue was inserted to jog my memory if the name returned I have to say now, before I forget, that the book left me with a lingering question, which I mentally asked over and over as the book drew to a close WHAT HAPPENED TO THE RABBITS There was this lovely scientist living in some remote area with his wi I thought this book would likely be boring but no Hoffman starts with a bang and generally kept me turning the pages I did not remember all the Russian names, but I didn t have to, as some clue was inserted to jog my memory if the name returned I have to say now, before I forget, that the book left me with a lingering question, which I mentally asked over and over as the book drew to a close WHAT HAPPENED TO THE RABBITS There was this lovely scientist living in some remote area with his wife and children They used rabbits to test their biological warfare on One night some wolves got hold of the injected rabbits and tore them limb from limb but did not eat them The scientist and his family had been starving for some time, and so he put the rabbits in the freezer.and we never hear of the rabbits again Or the family.At first, I thought the book was going to be all yay Regan or Yay Gorbachev but fortunately it was not I WAS glad I had read other Russian historical books, though, or I might have been a little misled As to Regan, well, you have your thoughts and I have mine If you are the paranoid type do not read this book It makes it all too clear how we could all be wiped out without anyone being the wiser Not even the instigators Who knows what biological warfare may be still stored anywhere, as all governments tend to be paranoid, and the Russians maybe a littleso At least we can rent a room at a Motel 6 and feel pretty certain it s not bugged Honestly, it s been several weeks since I read this book, and the things I should know best I have forgotten I have not forgotten that Hoffman did a whale of a good job on this, and I know there is a subsequent one, which I plan to get soon


  6. says:

    A chilling account of how close the world came to nuclear catastrophe during the Cold War and also a fascinating account of how the Cold War ended Very interesting on the dynamics of the Reagan Gorbachev relationship and also the whole parallel worlds of the US and Soviet Union and their perceptions of each other Most worryingly it has details of the appalling biological weapons programs the Soviets pursued right up to the end and beyond of the Cold War in contravention of treaties they had si A chilling account of how close the world came to nuclear catastrophe during the Cold War and also a fascinating account of how the Cold War ended Very interesting on the dynamics of the Reagan Gorbachev relationship and also the whole parallel worlds of the US and Soviet Union and their perceptions of each other Most worryingly it has details of the appalling biological weapons programs the Soviets pursued right up to the end and beyond of the Cold War in contravention of treaties they had signed It is a very concrete book based on the author s visits to key sites in the history of the Cold War in the former Soviet Union and his interviews with key players Not for the faint hearted


  7. says:

    The Cold War seems both so recent and so long ago This book brought back memories of the day to day events and the feelings they engendered It was a fascinating summary of the diplomacy that brought down Communism in the Soviet Union and eastern Europe The back and forth of arms negotiations which did result in a reduction of nuclear weapons were revealing Gorbachev come across as the major hero at least to me for being willing to make major changes in his system of government, though he s The Cold War seems both so recent and so long ago This book brought back memories of the day to day events and the feelings they engendered It was a fascinating summary of the diplomacy that brought down Communism in the Soviet Union and eastern Europe The back and forth of arms negotiations which did result in a reduction of nuclear weapons were revealing Gorbachev come across as the major hero at least to me for being willing to make major changes in his system of government, though he seems a tragic figure as his country falls apart geographically and its economy collapses The author hasappreciation for Reagan than I do and George HW Bush comes across pretty badly He devotes a lot of space to biological weapons, which the Soviet Union continued to produce in vast quantities long after a treaty banning them Uncounted stocks of nuclear components, biological and chemical weapons that remained as the Soviet Union broke up were appallingly tended who knows what happened to some of them This book also has interesting profiles of many of the scientists involved in the biological weapons programs and what happened to them I would recommend it both to someone who lived though the events and to someone for whom it seems like ancient history


  8. says:

    Great reporting and research I d barely heard of the Biopreparat, despite The Doomsday Men s emphasis on biochem particularly Shir Ishii s Unit 731 Pretty crappy writing, though The whole thing has a definite air of being hustled together on a bunch of adderall.


  9. says:

    Awesome recounting of the end of the cold war From Reagan through Yelstin Reagan come across as a hero Gates Snowcroft come off as kind of tools.The sections on the biological weapons of the Soviets are really wild scary.


  10. says:

    Just a few decades later, it s hard to imagine how humanity spent so long living on the nuclear brink Yet, throughout the Cold War, presidents, politicians, and generals in the United States and Soviet Union spent a good chunk of their time thinking about the unthinkable, how to end billions of human lives David Hoffman s book, although overlong and often circuitous, shows us how close we were to destruction, and why we decided to step back from the edge.As Ronald Reagan remembered in his me Just a few decades later, it s hard to imagine how humanity spent so long living on the nuclear brink Yet, throughout the Cold War, presidents, politicians, and generals in the United States and Soviet Union spent a good chunk of their time thinking about the unthinkable, how to end billions of human lives David Hoffman s book, although overlong and often circuitous, shows us how close we were to destruction, and why we decided to step back from the edge.As Ronald Reagan remembered in his memoir, during his presidency he carried no wallet or money, no keys in my pockets only secret codes that were capable of bringing about the annihilation of much of the world as we know it Since Dwight Eisenhower, U.S Presidents have been shadowed at all times by aides with a nuclear football, a briefcase containing the launch codes and targets for nuclear attack The increased speed of nuclear missiles, however, meant Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan had to confront the possibility these codes could be used in minutes The Soviet intermediate range SS N 18 s placed in Europe in 1978 threatened to blow up that continent in five or six minutes, while the Pershing missiles placed there in response in 1983 threatened Moscow in the same time period Both sides worried about what to do if they could not communicate to launch in time, and became obsessed with command and control channels The Russians created a semi dead hand nuclear system, whereby a communications missile would launch after a nuclear strike and send codes out to all silos to fire when ready The world was on hair trigger alert for years.Reagan thought he had found a way out, comprehensive missile defense One revelation from the book is just how important Reagan s Strategic Defense Initiative, or Star Wars, was in the superpower standoff in the 1980s After Reagan s assistant Martin Anderson, his friend Karl Bendetsen, and the scientist Edward Teller all suggested to Reagan that he should propose a defense against nuclear attack, Reagan announced the idea to the world on March 23, 1983, against the advice of almost all his Cabinet The Soviets became obsessed with the danger it posed to their retaliation capability, even though it remained nothan a drawing board plan One KGB agent estimated that 40% of the info coming across his desk in that time had to do with missile defense Ending the SDI was also the main stumbling block between Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev in negotiating what each secretly longed for, the end of nuclear weapons.Yet by 1987, Gorbachev and Reagan negotiated an accord taking the intermediate missiles out of Europe By 1990 the Soviet economy was collapsing so fast that both sides engaged in an arms race in reverse, deactivating submarines and missiles and planes by the thousands, and, for the Soviet Union, finally winding down the extensive biological weapons complex they had illegally kept Soon, the US began spending billions not to build weapons but to prevent Soviet weapons and scientists from falling into the wrong hands U.S inspectors found purified uranium stacked in buckets in unlocked warehouses, or dropped about the floor in empty office buildings Soviet trains to take weapons back from the old Soviet satellite countries had missiles tied down with wire and sticking out of the sides of the cars It was a precarious time, and Hoffman makes clear that despite American efforts under the Nunn Lugar Act to safeguard it, some of the Soviet arsenal probably got away The greater Cold War terror did end By 1991, George H.W Bush could ask his staff if nuclear football could stop trailing him everywhere, but they convinced him against it The football still trails the President today It is a perfect metaphor for what Hoffman calls the Dead Hand, the continued danger, fear, and destruction that remains from the Cold War arms race, which still threatens much of our lives, even when the creators of the race have long passed

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